Connection types

 

Most debuggers will give you the option to connect to a target using different methods.  Some commonly used connection types are: Single-core, Symmetric Multiprocessing (SMP), and Asymmetric Multiprocessing (AMP).  We will describe each connection type and when you might want to use them.

Single-core connection

A single-core connection usually means that the debugger will connect to only one core of a processor.  For example, if you have a four-core Cortex-A72 processor, and you establish a single-core debug connection to the core 0, then the debugger will connect only to Cortex-A72 core 0, which can be written as Cortex-A72_0.  The following diagram illustrates a single-core connection to Cortex-A72_0 of a four core Cortex-A72 processor:

This image shows a debugger connection with a single-core processor

Making a single-core connection usually means that the debugger operations will only affect one core.  For example, if you use a debugger to halt the Cortex-A72_0 core, the other cores in the Cortex-A72 processor will not halt.

When using a single-core connection on targets that have more than one core, halting the single core may cause issues on the target. This is because, when halted, the core cannot receive or acknowledge any messages from any other core.  If the other cores rely on the single core responding, the other cores may enter a problematic state if no responses occur.

Single-core connections are useful if you want to interact with only one core without affecting the other cores or processors on the SoC.

Symmetric Multiprocessing connection

A Symmetric Multiprocessing (SMP) connection usually means that the debugger will connect to multiple cores or processors at the same time.  For example, if you have a four-core Cortex-A72 processor, and you establish an SMP connection to the processor, then the debugger will connect to all four cores of the Cortex-A72 processor.  You can see this example connection in the following diagram:

This image shows a debugger SMP connection 

An SMP connection can also take place when you connect two of more different processors at the same time.  For example, if you have a two-core Cortex-A72 processor and a four-core Cortex-A53 processor, and you establish an SMP connection to both processors, the debugger will connect to all the Cortex-A72 and Cortex-A53 cores at the same time.  The following diagram illustrates this example:

This image shows a debugger connected to two multi-core processors 

For Arm Development Studio, this type of connection is called a big.LITTLE connection.

Making an SMP connection usually means that a debugger operation for one of the cores will affect all the cores.  For example, if you use a debugger to halt the Cortex-A72_0 core, the other cores in the Cortex-A72 will also halt.

Depending on the debugger, performing an SMP connection might also imply other factors to a debug environment.  For instance, an SMP connection in Arm Development Studio will imply to the debugger that:

  • All the cores or processors in the connection have the same device memory map
  • All the cores or processors will use the same image during execution
  • All the cores or processors have identical debug hardware

An SMP connection is useful if you want to see the interaction between multiple cores or processors at the same time, and if you want debug operations to affect all processors or cores in the connection.

Asymmetric Multiprocessing connection

Like an SMP connection, an Asymmetric Multiprocessing (AMP) connection usually means that the debugger will simultaneously connect to multiple cores or processors.  The difference between an SMP connection and an AMP connection is that the cores or processors that the debugger connects to do not operate in the same way.

For instance, let’s look at an SoC which contains a Cortex-A72 processor for application execution, and a Cortex-M4 core to control the power and reset logic.  Because they are different architectures, the Cortex-A72 and Cortex-M4 in this heterogeneous platform will not run the same program, and do not have the same debug hardware.  If you want to view the state of all these cores, you would establish an AMP connection.  An AMP connection will provide a connection to both the Cortex-A72 and the Cortex-M4 simultaneously, but will imply a looser coupling between the two devices to the debugger.  The following diagram illustrates an AMP connection to a Cortex-A72 and a Cortex-M4 processor:

This image shows a debugger connected to a single-core and a multi-core processor 

Depending on the debugger, an AMP connection might cause debug operations performed on one core to affect the other cores in the connection.  For example, if you halt the Cortex-A72_0 core with a debugger, the rest of the cores in the Cortex-A72 processor will probably halt, but the Cortex-M4 might not halt.

An AMP connection is useful if you want to see the state of multiple cores, which are performing different operations, at the same time.

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