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6.8.1. External aborts

External memory errors are defined as those that occur in the memory system other than those that are detected by an MMU. External memory errors are expected to be extremely rare and are likely to be fatal to the running process. An example of an event that can cause an external memory error is an uncorrectable parity or ECC failure on a level two memory structure.

External abort on instruction fetch

Externally generated errors during an instruction prefetch are precise in nature, and are only recognized by the processor if it attempts to execute the instruction fetched from the location that caused the error. The resulting failure is reported in the Instruction Fault Status Register if no higher priority abort (including a Data Abort) has taken place.

If there is an External Abort during a cache line fill to the a memory barrier, the cache line being filled is not marked as valid. If the abort occurred on a word that the core subsequently attempts to execute, a precise abort occurs.

The Fault Address Register is not updated on an External Abort on instruction fetch.

External abort on data read/write

Externally generated errors during a data read or write can be imprecise. This means that r14_abt on entry into the abort handler on such an abort might not hold an address that is related to the instruction that caused the exception. Correspondingly, External Aborts can be unrecoverable. See Aborts for more details.

If there is an External Abort during a cache line fill to the data cache, the cache line being filled is not marked as valid. If the abort occurred on a word that the core has requested, then the core takes an External Abort. This abort might be precise or imprecise as detailed in Changes to existing interrupt vectors.

The Fault Address Register is not updated on an imprecise External Abort on a data access.

External abort on a hardware page table walk

An External Abort occurring on a hardware page table access must be returned with the page table data. Such aborts are precise. The Fault Address Register is updated on an External Abort on a hardware page table walk on a data access, but not on an instruction access. The appropriate Fault Status Register indicates that this has occurred.