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ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2, Interrupt Controller Hyp Active Priorities Group 1 Registers, n = 0 - 3

The ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2 characteristics are:

Purpose

Provides information about Group 1 virtual active priorities for EL2.

Configuration

AArch64 System register ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2 bits [31:0] are architecturally mapped to AArch32 System register ICH_AP1R<n>[31:0] .

If EL2 is not implemented, this register is RES0 from EL3.

This register has no effect if EL2 is not enabled in the current Security state.

Some or all RW fields of this register have defined reset values. These apply only if the PE resets into an Exception level that is using AArch64. Otherwise, RW fields in this register reset to architecturally UNKNOWN values.

Attributes

ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2 is a 64-bit register.

Field descriptions

The ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2 bit assignments are:

6362616059585756555453525150494847464544434241403938373635343332
RES0
P31P30P29P28P27P26P25P24P23P22P21P20P19P18P17P16P15P14P13P12P11P10P9P8P7P6P5P4P3P2P1P0
313029282726252423222120191817161514131211109876543210

Bits [63:32]

Reserved, RES0.

P<x>, bit [x], for x = 0 to 31

Group 1 interrupt active priorities. Possible values of each bit are:

P<x>Meaning
0b0

There is no Group 1 interrupt active with this priority level, or all active Group 1 interrupts with this priority level have undergone priority-drop.

0b1

There is a Group 1 interrupt active with this priority level which has not undergone priority drop.

The correspondence between priority levels and bits depends on the number of bits of priority that are implemented.

If 5 bits of preemption are implemented (bits [7:3] of priority), then there are 32 preemption levels, and the active state of these preemption levels are held in ICH_AP1R0_EL2 in the bits corresponding to Priority[7:3].

If 6 bits of preemption are implemented (bits [7:2] of priority), then there are 64 preemption levels, and:

  • The active state of preemption levels 0 - 124 are held in ICH_AP1R0_EL2 in the bits corresponding to 0:Priority[6:2].
  • The active state of preemption levels 128 - 252 are held in ICH_AP1R1_EL2 in the bits corresponding to 1:Priority[6:2].

If 7 bits of preemption are implemented (bits [7:1] of priority), then there are 128 preemption levels, and:

  • The active state of preemption levels 0 - 62 are held in ICH_AP1R0_EL2 in the bits corresponding to 00:Priority[5:1].
  • The active state of preemption levels 64 - 126 are held in ICH_AP1R1_EL2 in the bits corresponding to 01:Priority[5:1].
  • The active state of preemption levels 128 - 190 are held in ICH_AP1R2_EL2 in the bits corresponding to 10:Priority[5:1].
  • The active state of preemption levels 192 - 254 are held in ICH_AP1R3_EL2 in the bits corresponding to 11:Priority[5:1].
Note

Having the bit corresponding to a priority set to 1 in both ICH_AP0R<n>_EL2 and ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2 might result in UNPREDICTABLE behavior of the interrupt prioritization system for virtual interrupts.

This field resets to 0.

This register is always used for legacy VMs, regardless of the group of the virtual interrupt. Reads and writes to GICV_APR<n> access ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2. For more information about support for legacy VMs, see Support for legacy operation of VMs.

Accessing the ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2

ICH_AP1R1_EL2 is only implemented in implementations that support 6 or more bits of preemption. ICH_AP1R2_EL2 and ICH_AP1R3_EL2 are only implemented in implementations that support 7 bits of preemption. Unimplemented registers are UNDEFINED.

Note

The number of bits of preemption is indicated by ICH_VTR_EL2.PREbits

Writing to these registers with any value other than the last read value of the register (or 0x00000000 for a newly set up virtual machine) can result in UNPREDICTABLE behavior of the virtual interrupt prioritization system allowing either:

Writing to the active priority registers in any order other than the following order will result in UNPREDICTABLE behavior:

Accesses to this register use the following encodings:

MRS <Xt>, ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2

op0op1CRnCRmop2
0b110b1000b11000b10010b0[n:1:0]
if PSTATE.EL == EL0 then
    UNDEFINED;
elsif PSTATE.EL == EL1 then
    if EL2Enabled() && HCR_EL2.<NV2,NV> == '11' then
        return NVMem[0x4A0+8*UInt(op2<1:0>)];
    elsif EL2Enabled() && HCR_EL2.NV == '1' then
        AArch64.SystemAccessTrap(EL2, 0x18);
    else
        UNDEFINED;
elsif PSTATE.EL == EL2 then
    if ICC_SRE_EL2.SRE == '0' then
        AArch64.SystemAccessTrap(EL2, 0x18);
    else
        return ICH_AP1R_EL2[UInt(op2<1:0>)];
elsif PSTATE.EL == EL3 then
    if ICC_SRE_EL3.SRE == '0' then
        AArch64.SystemAccessTrap(EL3, 0x18);
    else
        return ICH_AP1R_EL2[UInt(op2<1:0>)];
              

MSR ICH_AP1R<n>_EL2, <Xt>

op0op1CRnCRmop2
0b110b1000b11000b10010b0[n:1:0]
if PSTATE.EL == EL0 then
    UNDEFINED;
elsif PSTATE.EL == EL1 then
    if EL2Enabled() && HCR_EL2.<NV2,NV> == '11' then
        NVMem[0x4A0+8*UInt(op2<1:0>)] = X[t];
    elsif EL2Enabled() && HCR_EL2.NV == '1' then
        AArch64.SystemAccessTrap(EL2, 0x18);
    else
        UNDEFINED;
elsif PSTATE.EL == EL2 then
    if ICC_SRE_EL2.SRE == '0' then
        AArch64.SystemAccessTrap(EL2, 0x18);
    else
        ICH_AP1R_EL2[UInt(op2<1:0>)] = X[t];
elsif PSTATE.EL == EL3 then
    if ICC_SRE_EL3.SRE == '0' then
        AArch64.SystemAccessTrap(EL3, 0x18);
    else
        ICH_AP1R_EL2[UInt(op2<1:0>)] = X[t];
              


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