You copied the Doc URL to your clipboard.

Chart Configuration view options

The Chart Configuration view is broken down into chart controls, each of which defines the values and look of an individual chart in the Timeline view. Every chart control contains a number of series. These series define the data sets that the chart displays.

For example, the Interrupt chart control contains two series, IRQ and SoftIRQ.

Figure 19. The Interrupt chart control

The Interrupt chart control

The IRQ series uses data from the $Linux_irq_irq counter, while SoftIRQ uses $Linux_irq_softirq.

In the chart control, the CPU Activity chart is defined as a Stacked chart, so the Timeline view draws it as two stacked line graphs:

Figure 20. The Interrupts chart

The Interrupts chart

Chart options

Each chart in the Chart Configuration view has the following options:

Title

Use this field to give the chart a title. The title appears at the top of the handle for the chart in the Timeline view.

Type

The Type drop-down menu enables you to choose between one of the following chart types:

Fill

A fill chart contains a line for each series defined in the chart control. The area below the line is filled with the color defined in the series control for each data set. Series higher in the chart control appear behind series that are lower in the chart control. So if series A is the first series in a chart control and has a value of three and series B appears second in the chart control and has a value of five, this value from series A is obstructed from view by the larger value of series B. For this reason, it is important to place higher value series higher in the chart control when using a fill chart. Drag and drop series controls to reorder them.

Figure 21. Data from series A obstructed by data from series B

Data from series A obstructed by data from series B

Stacked

In a stacked style chart, filled line charts are stacked on top of each other. The Timeline view stacks a filled line graph representing the series at the top of the chart control on top of series that appear beneath it. So the highest point of the graphs in a stack chart is an aggregate of data from all of the series contained in the chart control. For example, if the first value of series A is three and first value of series B is five, the first data point in the stack chart that contains these series is eight.

Figure 22. A stack chart example

A stack chart example

Percentage

In a percentage style chart, values between 0.0-1.0 are plotted as bar charts. Each bin in the chart is represented by a colored bar. Like the stack view, values from higher series are stacked on top of values from lower series and the total bar height represents the aggregate.

Figure 23. A percentage chart example

A percentage chart example

Average Cores

When you have this option checked, values in a multi-core chart are averaged when you have not used the multi-core disclosure control to show per core data. If you have not checked this chart control option, the multi-core chart shows the totals from all cores.

Average Selection

When you have this option checked, any selection you make using the cross-section marker shows the average value of all bins included in the selection. If unchecked the overlay is a total value of all bins.

Series Options

Each series in a chart contains the following options:

Color

To change the color of a series the Timeline view, double-click on the color box in their series control. This opens the color dialog box:

Figure 24. The Color dialog box

The Color dialog box

Pick a new color for the event from the existing options or define a custom color. Streamline uses this defined color for the series in the Timeline view.

Desc.

Enter a description for the series in this field. When you hover over the series title or color in the Timeline view, a tooltip appears, containing the description defined here.

Source

Use this field to define the data set that the series uses. Press Ctrl + Space or the $ symbol to activate a drop-menu that shows you a list of counters. Double-click on a counter to add it to the Source field. You can add more than one counter to the source field this way using a combination of counter names and any of the following common regular expressions: >, <, >=, <=, ==, !=, ||, !, &&, %, *, /, +, -. You can use parentheticals to define the order of operation. In addition to the mathematical and comparative operators, you can use the following expressions in the Source field.:

if

Evaluates whether a condition is true or false before a applying an effect. Usage: if(x, y, z), where x is the statement to be analyzed, y is the applied effect if the statement is true, and z is applied effect if the statement is false.

abs

Returns the absolute value of the numeric expression specified as the parameter. Usage: abs(x), where x is a numeric expression.

ceiling

Returns the smallest integer that is greater than or equal to the numeric expression given as a parameter. Usage: ceiling(x), where x is a numeric expression.

floor

Returns the largest integer that is less than or equal to a numeric expression given as a parameter. Usage: floor(x), where x is a numeric expression.

max

Returns the maximum value from the given numeric expression. Usage: max(x), where x is a numeric expression.

min

Returns the minimum value from the given numeric expression. Usage: min(x), where x is a numeric expression.

round

Returns a numeric expression that is rounded to the specified length. The length parameter must evaluate to an integer. Usage: round(x, y), where x is a numeric expression and y is the precision length.

freq

Converts the value in a given numerical expression to a rate. Usage: freq(x), where x is a numeric expression.

Units

Enter the unit type for the series. The value you enter in this field appears when you use the cross-section marker to select one or more bins.

Was this page helpful? Yes No